McCall’s M7405 Pattern Review

This is a late pattern review for me because I made this dress last summer. Now that we are nearing this summer, I’ve had a chance to wear this dress a few times. So now that I think about it, that makes it an even better review! So let me start by saying that this is a very nice summer dress. It is however, shapeless. So it is best paired with a denim jacket or a floppy hat or a really cute pair of sandals or heels. The best part about this dress is the neckline gathers. It also has a back neck slit.

So on to my pattern review. I sewed the McCall’s pattern M7405. I picked this pattern because it is designed for the beginner. The instructions are easy to follow. There is no zipper since it is a loose fitting pullover dress. You can learn how to make a casing with a drawstring, which is the gathered neckline.

I picked view A which is a dress with a straight skirt above the knee. There are other hemline variations such as long, long with a slit and a shaped hemline. This pattern suggests medium weight woven and knit fabrics such as challis, cotton knit, crepe and gauze. I chose a crepe fabric.

I have one issue with this dress which can be easily resolved. The armholes are too long. The opening is too far down. I think I probably could have sewed a size smaller especially since it is a loose fitting dress. That might have resolved the too long armhole issue. But since I didn’t figure this out until after the dress was finished, I can just do some quick alterations by fixing the armholes to fit.

Can’t wait to wear this dress again this summer! This time with armholes that fit…

B5955 Butterick pattern review

My latest sewing project was a blouse using the Butterick pattern B5955. The description of the blouse states that it is a very loose-fitting pullover that has a V-neck top and a back yoke with slightly forward shoulder seams extending into dolman sleeves.

Butterick patterns have 5 types of fit. These are fitted, close fitting, loose fitting, semi fitted and very loose fitting. You can find these terms in the garment descriptions on the Butterick pattern envelopes. These 5 terms will tell you what to anticipate when it comes to the fitting of the item. Each term indicates an amount of wearing ease that is built into the pattern. Ease is the extra inches built into a pattern for wearing room.

That being said, in reviewing this pattern, this finished blouse ended up being extremely large for me the first time I sewed it. I had to adjust it to fit afterwards and sew it to fit again. This could have been prevented had I taken notice of the wearing ease of this pattern. As described on the envelope, this is a very loose fitting blouse. According to the Butterick ease chart, very loose fitting will have an ease of over 8 inches. That’s alot!

After sewing the blouse to fit me again, I took a picture of the blouse that actually fit me compared to the sewing pattern. What a big difference!

In addition and most importantly, I should have also taken notice of the pattern’s finished garment measurements. Had I done this, I probably would have sewn a blouse that fit me the first time based on my measurements regardless of ease.

You can find the finished garment measurements by looking on the tissue and finding the symbol that looks like a circle with a cross through it.

On a side note, I have noticed that most sewing patterns have so much wearing ease in the patterns that in most cases, you can get away with wearing one size smaller than the pattern companies tell you that you do based on your measurements.

So onto my finished product. This pattern calls for crepe de chine, lawn, or charmeuse fabric. I used a navy cotton lawn. I changed up the pattern a little bit by folding the end of the sleeves and sewing it in place.

I will definitely sew this blouse again, except next time, I will use a crepe de chine with a pattern on the fabric. I felt that using the navy colored cotton lawn made me look like I was wearing scrubs.

Here is my finished product:

Baby clothes quilt

I have a confession. I’m a hoarder. A baby clothes hoarder. Because for 21 years I kept a bag of Sabrina’s baby clothes. For twenty one years. I lugged that garbage bag full of clothes from residence to residence. I’ve been a faithful hoarder to that bag of clothes. Now, they weren’t all of Sabrina’s baby clothes, just my favorite outfits and hats. I just couldn’t part with them. They reminded me of her special baby memories.

From the day I put those baby clothes in that garbage bag with every intention of hoarding them, my goal was to make a quilt out of them. I didn’t even know how to sew back then, let alone sew a quilt. But I figured that one day I would teach myself. I knew it would be a long time before I would teach myself how to sew. So I knew that the sentence for these bag of hoarded baby clothes would be long. Yes, they were treated fairly. They lived in a nice cool garage safely tucked inside a box. I sometimes forgot about them. Every once in a while, I remembered that I had them and reminded myself about my intention to teach myself how to sew a quilt. Well, finally, about a year and a half ago, I taught myself how to sew.

Then this happened:

I finally made Sabrina her baby clothes quilt! 21 years later. I made it and presented it to her at Christmas. She loved it! It isn’t a perfectly sewn quilt. But it’s a quilt made from clothes that I put on her when she was a little baby girl. My little baby girl. Now she is a grown woman and the proud owner of a very special quilt made by her mommy with lots of love. This quilt contains very special memories. Her special memories. My special memories of her.

Like her first baby gap outfit that I loved to death and put on her so many times. It even had little matching baby shoes. Her Minnie Mouse hat that we bought for her at Disneyland. Her first Disneyland hat. Her 1st birthday party dress that her Auntie Sherri bought for her.

What a great way to piece together and preserve all of your baby’s special memories. It was heartwarming to put this quilt together. As I worked with every article of clothing, I reminisced about Sabrina as a baby. This quilt is so special because it contains the special memories of my daughter from when she was a little baby girl.

Totally worth the hoarding.

Today I am grateful for babies and memories.

1st birthday banner

Here is an idea on how to use leftover scraps of material to make a cute banner. This banner was used for a 1st birthday. It was tied around the birthday boy’s highchair.

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Look! How cute! My daughter did the writing.

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And ooh, yummy… Look at them cupcakes…(check out the cupcakes in this post.)

Back to the subject, want to know how to make this simple and adorable birthday banner using material that you might already have in your craft box? Check out the tutorial here.

Let your creativity flow.

Simplicity 1693- summer tanks

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I must really like this pattern because I used it 5 times! I made two tank tops using view F and two tank tops using view C. I also made a top from view F by adding cap sleeves to the tank top pattern.

So, here is a top using view F.

The back has a little keyhole. Since I’m still learning to sew, I didn’t sew in a button at the top of the keyhole. I’ll learn how to sew a button on someday. Luckily, my head was able to fit through! The fabric that I used for this tank top is a crepe de chine. I like how it drapes.

Here is a top using view C. I opted not to put in the elastic at the waist. This view requires only ONE YARD of fabric! That is awesome because I’m always looking for one yard wonders. This fabric is cotton. Not very drape-y, but I think it looks good with jeans. I originally bought this fabric to sew napkins, but I decided to try it out on this pattern instead.

So here is another tank top using view F. I should mention that this top is longer in the back, so it has a high-low look. I used cotton fabric to make this one. This fabric was also intended for sewing napkins, but I changed my mind and made a top instead.

Here is view F again, but I added cap sleeves to it. I used a challis fabric. Soft and flowy.

Here is view C. I had one yard of fabric leftover from a dress that I made. So I made another tank top.

Safe to say that I’ve had a lot of practice making tank tops this summer! Perfect for those hot summer days.
Keep cool.

McCalls’s M7120

I picked the McCall’s M7120 dress pattern for my summer sewing project collection. I picked this pattern because it is designed for beginners. It is really easy to use and the instructions were easy to follow. There is no zipper since it is a pullover dress. It also teaches you how to sew darts and make a fabric belt.  This dress has a semi fitted ease. The pattern is designed for medium weight woven fabrics such as linen, chambray, cotton blends and crepe de chine.

 

I picked view D. View D has a high-low skirt which I am not really fond of but figured it would be a good lesson in sewing. I used a lightweight chambray. It was my first time sewing chambray fabric and I realized that it is an easy fabric to sew. I opted to not make the fabric belt. Here’s how it turned out:

I ironed the dress a couple times with steam but it still came out pretty wrinkly. I guess the fabric itself wrinkles easily.

I figure wrinkled dresses are part of my style anyway. Can’t wait to wear my new dress!

Gathered skirt using fabric with a border

I finally finished my gathered skirt! I found this beautiful fabric at Joann’s. It is from Gretchen Hirsch’s fabric line. I love the white polka dots against the yellow background and the pink roses with the green leaves are so pretty! The colors just POP! Most importantly, it has that vintage vibe that I love so much.

I found a tutorial on Gertie’s blog for better sewing on how to make a gathered skirt. (find it here: how to make a gathered skirt by blogforbettersewing.com). By the way, Gertie is Gretchen Hirsch. This fabric is from her fabric line! So following this tutorial with this fabric was perfect! I used this tutorial specifically because it works well for fabric with a border. Gertie also has another tutorial but for a wrap skirt. It uses this exact same fabric. You can find the tutorial here: Border print wrap skirt by Gretchen Hirsch. And now, I shall unveil my (eh-hem) masterpiece! Here it is! My finished gathered skirt!

Can’t wait to wear it!